Feb 052021
Ten Books I Plan to Read in 2021

Recently, I asked if anyone would be interested in a post about my TBR (to be read) list, and a friend said yes. So, here are ten books I plan to read in 2021, and why I want to read them! What are you looking forward to reading this year?

For more books see:
Jane Eyre by Charlotte BrontΓ«

I’m embarrassed that Jane Eyre is one of my favourite classic romances (based on my love of the 1996 film), and yet I’ve never got around to reading it. I wanted to include at least once classic on my 2021 TBR, and it’s about time that I pick up Jane Eyre! My copy has been waiting patiently on my bookshelf for decades.

Jane Eyre

The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr.

I’ve heard great things about this novel, which came out at the start of the year. All I know is that it’s about two enslaved men on a Southern plantation, it’s a queer romance, and it’s set across several time periods. Romance is not a genre I normally gravitate towards, but I want to keep an open mind and try reading new genres and styles of writing this year.

The Prophets

How to Avoid a Climate Disaster by Bill Gates

This new climate change book by Bill Gates comes out in February. Love him or hate him, Gates has spent decades using his wealth to fund scientific research, including investigating climate change. To put it simply, I’m curious to read what he has to say. As one of the wealthiest people in the world, I hope the book addresses how the 1% of people like him need to be held accountable in terms of funding climate change solutions, and divesting from fossil fuels.

How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

I asked for book recommendations on Instagram, and a high school friend said this is one of his favourites. Dark Matter is a sci fi thriller, and that’s pretty much all I know since I don’t want to spoil it for myself by reading a full synopsis. I need a good sci fi on this list, so sign me up!

Dark Matter

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

Hamnet came out in 2020 and won the Women’s Prize for Fiction. It has been described by many as a masterpiece, and I just didn’t get around to reading it last year. Hamnet is historical fiction, and tells the tragic story of Shakespeare’s son.

Hamnet

The New Wilderness by Dianne Cooke

The blurb for this book says it explores a mother-daughter relationship in a world ravaged by climate change and overpopulation. My first thought is that I shouldn’t be reading this type of novel right now. I’m already anxious about the pandemic and climate change. Nonetheless, my favourite genre is dystopian fiction, and this debut novel got great reviews, so it’s on the TBR.

The New Wilderness

The Bass Rock by Evie Wyld

Set in Scotland and over several centuries, The Bass Rock follows the stories of three interconnected women. One is accused of witchcraft in the 1700s, the second is trying to cope with post-WW2 domestic life, and the third is a contemporary character sorting through belongings of her deceased father. I love interwoven plots over time periods, so I will likely enjoy this book!

The Bass Rock

The Overstory by Richard Powers

It’s about trees and activism… I think. I’m guessing that The Overstory will be similar to Barkskins, in that is chronicles the destruction of forests over time. Barkskins is one of my favourite books, so I’m eager to read The Overstory. Plus, it won a Pulitzer, and I generally enjoy award winning books.

For my review of Barkskins, see: Books I Read in 2019

The Overstory

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel

Last year, people were obsessing over Station Eleven, presumably because it’s set in a pandemic. It follows a group of traveling thespians performing Shakespeare at outposts near the Great Lakes. Like other books on this list, the plot moves back and forth in time, and has interconnected characters.

Station Eleven

Wanderland by Jini Reddy

Reddy travels around Britain looking at natural landscapes. Since I loved Underland by Robert Macfarlane, I think this will offer a complementary multicultural perspective, given that Reddy discusses otherness.

Wanderland

So there you have it, ten books I plan to read in 2021. As I mentioned in my Goals for 2021, I would like to read at least 21 books, and these books will get me off to a great start. Have you read any of these? If so, what did you think (no spoilers please!)?

Happy Reading!

 

 

 

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